Miss Nightingale in London’s Hippodrome

Love musicals?
Love war history?
Love sauciness?
Love scandals?
Then you’ll love Miss Nightingale The Musical at London’s Hippodrome

This is the most explosive, scandalises, sauciness play you will see this year.

The musical play is set in 1942.  It is based upon a underground cabaret club that is set in the middle of the war.  Saucy new singer whom is called Miss Nightingale is thrust into the spotlight.  Relationships and scandals. However two men struggle to bring their love out of the shadows.

With so many twists and many secrets are revealed and lies exposed, the only resistance is to stand up and be counted.

A deeply touching and raucously funny tale of prejudice, passion and debauchery during the dark days of World War Two.  Miss Nightingale brings the scandals, satire, and spunky spirit of the Forties sensationally to life.

Thanks to Miss Nightingale who let some of the members of Love Pop Ups London community come down to watch one of the most explosive and sauciest plays ever performed in The Vaults. Read all blogs/reviews from the comments section below.

 

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6 Comments

  1. hannah says:

    A musical in the West End – but not what I would call a ‘West End Musical’. While light-hearted, and funny in parts, Miss Nightingale still has a little way to go before it lives up to the reputation of a true West End Musical.

    On arrival at the venue, we entered through a flashy casino and onto the smaller theatre venue upstairs. The casino was an impressive venue – but in fact I think Miss Nightingale would be better suited to a small, speakeasy type venue like the Vaults where it started out.

    The theatre itself was pretty cold and had me reaching for my jacket throughout the performance. Plus, the small stage (and being seated towards one side of it) meant there were some very visible and clunky scene changes (at one point of the actors almost tripped off the side of the stage!)

    I was impressed by the attempts to set the scene – including the actors who worked the room before the show. I also liked the seating arrangements, as it felt more like we were in a cabaret venue.

    Some of the actors performances were a little underwhelming – many of the jokes seemed to fall flat (especially in the first half of the show) and some of the acting was particularly hammy. However, kudos must go to Matthew Floyd Jones for his stand out performance as George – his rendition of Meine Liebe Berlin left me with goose bumps.

    The second half of the show did show some improvement – I was particularly impressed by Maggie’s recovery after her glasses broke and flew across the stage. I also felt that, whilst the show tried to touch on series subjects, ultimately it was too light-hearted to explore this issues deeply. I think part of the problem here is it also felt like there were too many songs for the length of the show, and at points these distracted from the plot.

    Overall, while fun and uplifting in parts, Miss Nightingale still has room for improvement.

    *I’ve also shared this review on TimeOut*

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